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Explainer: Why Ethiopia is 7 years behind the rest of the world

 

– As countries around the world countdown to 2021, Ethiopia recently entered 2013

– The East African country is seven years behind the rest of the world because of the Calendar it adopted which is different from the one being used globally

– Ethiopia uses Coptic calendar, while other countries of the world use Gregorian calendar

While it is year 2020 globally, Ethiopia on September 11, entered the year 2013 and the people in the country celebrated the new year amid the coronavirus pandemic ravaging the world.

You may be wondering why the East African country is seven years behind the rest of the world.

Ethiopian entered the year 2013 on September 11. Photo credit: Face2FaceAfrica

Source: UGC

Well, Ethiopia follows a calendar similar to the ancient Julian calendar, which started disappearing from the West in the 16th century.

It should be noted that while Ethiopia uses the Coptic calendar, what the rest of the world adopts is the Gregorian calendar, which has 365 days in a year and 366 days in a leap year.

According to Face2FaceAfrica, the difference in year numbering is believed to be because the Ethiopian Orthodox Church does not agree with the Roman Catholic Church about when Christ was born.

The Gregorian calendar is factored in the calculation of the year in which Jesus was born, while the Coptic calendar is factored in the calculation of the Annunciation (Jesus’s conception, not birth) arrived at by Egyptian monk-historian Annianus of Alexandria.

The people around the country held a massive celebration to welcome the new year as other countries around the world countdown to 2021.

President Abiy Ahmed Ali led the country in ushering the new year in a colourful ceremony marked by feasting and dance.

To mark the 2013 new year, Ahmed invited a section of the elderly citizens, persons living with disability and homeless families for a luncheon at Addis Ababa on September 11.

“In the beginning of this Ethiopian new year, I am delighted to have lunch with the elderly, persons with disabilities and homeless children and youth of our city. In 2013, I call on all Ethiopians to care for the most vulnerable sections of our societies,” he said.

 

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